Hurricane Michael’s trail of destruction

Our guest blogger, Lynne McChristian, is an I.I.I. representative based in Tallahassee, about 100 miles from where Hurricane Michael came to shore.

 By Lynne McChristian

After a major natural disaster, there are various levels of survivor conditions – ranging from total devastation to mild inconvenience. In comparison to what people are experiencing in Mexico Beach and the Panama City areas of Florida, my inconveniences are extremely inconsequential. I was asked for a first-person account, and here’s where things stand on a Sunday afternoon.

In my Tallahassee neighborhood, we have been without power since about 2:20 p.m. on Wednesday. This is Day 5 of powerlessness. The air conditioners are silent in the 88-degree heat, but the rumble of portable generators is a bit overbearing, especially at night. The choice is to keep the refrigerator contents cool, or sleep.

At least we have that option and a place to sleep, whereas so many do not. Immediately after the storm, about 90% of the town was without electricity. What makes Tallahassee a beautiful part of the state is the same thing that makes it vulnerable to high winds. Decades old, stately oak trees and towering pines offer shady respite one day, and following a major storm, they become something altogether different – a barrier to returning to a comfort zone.

All over town, trees are twisted up in power lines.  The utility company has a goal of restoring power to most before the weekend is over – and so we wait. On Sunday night, 30 percent of residents still do not have power, and I among them.

I am the owner of a brand-new generator. For some, the purchase is a gamble. Bet on a fast recovery or spend $700 on a bulky tool, use it once and store it forever. My purchase was a risk management decision; my mom turned 95 last week, and she lives with me. The generator gives me confidence that she will have the steady stream of oxygen from the concentrator she uses, so it was a wise purchase in my situation. Thanks, Home Depot, for restocking the generators multiple times to aid.

Streets are clear here in the state capitol, lined with mounds and mounds of tree trunks and tree limbs. Many gas stations are out of gas. It’s an inconvenience; that is all. The focus of recovery is on the countless others who would look at this town’s Hurricane Michael experience and think it barely a blip. By comparison, it is.

 

Lynne McChristian, is I.I.I.’s Florida Representative, and  Assistant Lecturer and Executive Director of the  Center for Risk Management Education & Research at Florida State University’s College of Business.

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